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@coveringpotus See full size profile   News and analysis of President Trump and the White House from @washingtonpost

2 days ago

President Trump appears genuinely worried about the economy, which is showing increasing signs of instability. But just as he has before, the president has found one man on which to focus his blame. This time it is Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome H. Powell, The Post's Aaron Blake writes. Powell could be in for a world of pain ahead of the 2020 election — especially if things do go south. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

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3 days ago

President Trump on Tuesday claimed that if he had a “fair press” the 2020 election "would be over."

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3 days ago

President Trump enjoyed overwhelming support from white evangelicals in 2016, winning a higher percentage than George W. Bush, John McCain or Mitt Romney. That enthusiasm has hardly dimmed since then. Almost 70 percent of white evangelicals approve of Trump’s performance in office, according to a 2019 Pew Research Center poll. The Post's interviews with 50 evangelical Christians in three battleground states explain why. In conversation, evangelical voters paint the portrait of the Trump they see: a president who acts like a bully but is fighting for them. A president who sees America like they do, a menacing place where white Christians feel mocked and threatened for their beliefs. A president who’s against abortion and gay rights and who has the economy humming to boot. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Ilana Panich-Linsman for The Washington Post)

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3 days ago

On Tuesday, President Trump defended his promotion of a baseless conspiracy theory about the death of Jeffrey Epstein over the weekend, saying he had retweeted a “very highly respected conservative pundit” who is a “big Trump fan.” Trump on Saturday retweeted a message from conservative actor and comedian Terrence K. Williams that suggested former president Bill Clinton might have been involved in the death of Epstein. "That was a retweet," Trump said. "That wasn’t from me. That was from him, but he’s a man with half a million followers, a lot of followers. And he’s respected.” The president added: “So I think I was fine." Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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4 days ago

From paper straws to wind turbines to socially conservative issues, President Trump is deliberately amplifying public tensions by seizing on divisive topics to energize his base, campaign aides and White House advisers told The Post. The president is following much the same strategy that he pursued in 2016 — inserting himself into the issues his supporters are already discussing, and using blunt us-against-them language without regard to nuance or political correctness. As Democrats debate policy, Trump has sought to force his potential rivals to defend the most far-reaching cultural ideas circulating within their party. He has attacked his opponents as un-American, described entire U.S. cities as deplorable, and pitted his mostly white base against an increasingly diverse Democratic Party. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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4 days ago

Legal immigrants who use public benefits — such as Medicaid, food stamps or housing assistance — could have a tougher time obtaining a green card or U.S. citizenship under a policy change announced Monday that is at the center of the Trump administration’s effort to reduce immigration. The new policy for “Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds,” which appeared Monday on the Federal Register’s website and will take effect in two months, sets new standards for obtaining permanent residency and U.S. citizenship. The Trump administration has been seeking to limit those immigrants who might draw on taxpayer-funded benefits, such as many of those who have been fleeing Central America, while allowing more highly skilled and wealthy immigrants into the United States. Wealth, education, age and English-language skills will take on greater importance in the process for obtaining a green card, as the change seeks to redefine what it means to be a “public charge,” as well as who is likely to be one under U.S. immigration law. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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5 days ago

President Trump’s proclivity for spouting exaggerated numbers, unwarranted boasts and outright falsehoods has continued at a remarkable pace. As of Aug. 5, his 928th day in office, he had made 12,019 false or misleading claims, according to the Fact Checker’s database that analyzes, categorizes and tracks every suspect statement the president has uttered. Trump crossed the 10,000 mark on April 26, and he has been averaging about 20 fishy claims a day since then. From the start of his presidency, he has averaged about 13 such claims a day. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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5 days ago

President Trump on Saturday appeared to side with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un in renewing his objections to joint military exercises with South Korea, calling such drills “ridiculous and expensive” at a time when Pyongyang has been testing short-range missiles. In a pair of morning tweets from his resort in Bedminster, N.J., where he arrived late Friday for a 10-day vacation, Trump said Kim objected to the exercises in a letter and suggested that the missile tests would end once the drills are finished. Pyongyang has repeatedly insisted the tests are a reaction to joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises, as well as Seoul’s import of F-35A stealth fighters from the United States. Trump appeared to accept that explanation. He offered no rebuttal to the idea that the exercises were not worthwhile, even though his own military says they are vital to maintain combat readiness. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

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6 days ago

President Trump used his Twitter account Saturday to spread a baseless conspiracy theory about the death of Jeffrey Epstein, a wealthy and politically connected financier who had been facing multiple charges of sex trafficking involving underage girls. Trump’s own Justice Department announced that Epstein, who was being held in a federal corrections facility, died by “apparent suicide.” But Trump appeared to disregard his administration’s statement, instead retweeting a message from conservative actor and comedian Terrence K. Williams, who suggested Epstein’s death might be tied to former president Bill Clinton. Williams also questioned how Epstein could have died by suicide if he had been on suicide watch. The claim is completely unsubstantiated, and federal officials say Epstein was not on suicide watch at the time of his death. He had been placed on suicide watch last month but then taken off within a week, according to a person familiar with the matter. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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1 week ago

President Trump is slated to appear at a pair of fundraising events in the Hamptons on Friday, including one that charges up to $250,000 for lunch, a photo and a private roundtable with the president. The fundraisers are the latest sign that Trump is embracing the world of wealthy contributors who served as punching bags in his 2016 campaign. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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1 week ago

President Trump has repeatedly told lawmakers and aides in private conversations that he is open to endorsing extensive background checks in the wake of two mass shootings, prompting a warning from the National Rifle Association and concerns among White House aides, according to lawmakers and administration officials. Trump, speaking to reporters Wednesday before visiting Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, where weekend shootings left 31 dead, said there “was great appetite for background checks” amid an outcry over government inaction in the face of repeated mass shootings. Trump’s previous declarations of support for tougher gun controls, including after the deadly Parkland, Fla., shooting in February 2018, have foundered without a sustained push from the president and support from the NRA or Republican lawmakers. Even Trump’s advisers question how far he will go on any effort. NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre spoke with Trump on Tuesday after the president expressed support for a background check bill and told him it would not be popular among Trump’s supporters, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to freely discuss internal talks. LaPierre also argued against the bill’s merits, the officials said. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Evan Vucci/AP)

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1 week ago

On a day when President Trump vowed to tone down his rhetoric and help the country heal following two mass slayings, he did the opposite — lacing his visits Wednesday to El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, with a flurry of attacks on local leaders and memorializing his trips with grinning thumbs-up photos.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ In his only public remarks during the trip, Trump lashed out at Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, both Democrats, over their characterization of his visit with hospital patients in Dayton.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Trump falsely accused them of “totally misrepresenting” the reception he received at Miami Valley Hospital in Ohio. He alleged that their news conference immediately after the president’s visit “was a fraud.”⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Yet, Brown and Whaley described the visit by the president and first lady Melania Trump in favorable terms.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ “They were hurting. He was comforting. He did the right things. Melania did the right things,” Brown told reporters. “And it’s his job in part to comfort people. I’m glad he did it in those hospital rooms.”⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Whaley added: “I think the victims and the first responders were grateful that the President of the United States came to Dayton.”⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Read the full story, link in bio.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ (Photo by Evan Vucci/AP Photo)

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1 week ago

President Trump remained largely out of public view as he visited Dayton, Ohio, the first of his two scheduled stops Wednesday intended to console cities recovering from a pair of mass shootings over the weekend. Aside from brief appearances on the airport tarmac as he arrived and departed, Trump did not speak publicly or allow himself to be photographed. The visit to Dayton, a city of about 140,000 people, was a marked break with tradition, as presidents visiting grieving communities typically offer public condolences and use the opportunity to try to comfort the nation. Trump was greeted by scores of protesters in downtown Dayton and was expected to encounter more upon arriving Wednesday afternoon in El Paso, where 22 people died Saturday in a massacre that appeared to target immigrants. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by Ty Greenlees/Dayton Daily News via AP, Pool)

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1 week ago

President Trump said Wednesday that he is open to calling on Congress to return from recess to strengthen background checks for gun buyers but that he sees “no political appetite” for banning assault rifles. Trump’s comments came as he left the White House for visits to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso on a trip that risks stoking divisions rather than bringing the country together after a pair of mass shootings over the weekend. Speaking to reporters, Trump also dismissed critics who have suggested his rhetoric on race and immigration is partially to blame for a rise in hate-inspired violence like that in El Paso. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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1 week ago

As she leads a grieving city, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says she will confront President Trump when he visits on Wednesday by telling him “how unhelpful he’s been” on the issue of guns. Whaley, a Democrat, said she will “serve her official capacity as mayor” by welcoming Trump to Dayton in his “official capacity as president.” But Whaley said she expects protests because some Dayton residents have been unhappy with Trump’s leadership in the aftermath of shootings here and in El Paso. “I know he has made this bed, and he’s got to lie in it,” said Whaley, who was speaking in front of makeshift memorial honoring the victims Sunday’s mass shooting. “His rhetoric has been painful for many in our community, and I think the people should stand up and say they are not happy if they are not happy he’s coming.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by John Minchillo/AP)

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1 week ago

President Trump is preparing to visit El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, on Wednesday, appearances that will not be universally welcome as the two cities grieve from weekend mass shootings that left 31 dead and many injured and rattled. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway confirmed Trump’s plans while speaking to reporters Tuesday, saying he “has wanted to go there since he learned of these tragedies.” Several past and present Democratic officials urged Trump not to visit El Paso, a city of about 683,000 with a largely Latino population, in the aftermath of Saturday’s anti-immigrant attack at a Walmart Supercenter that left 22 dead. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @mattmcclainphoto /The Washington Post; iStock)

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1 week ago

Teleprompter Trump repudiated Twitter Trump in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House on Monday. Speaking in the wake of two mass shootings in less than 24 hours that left at least 31 dead over the weekend, President Trump spoke of “the inherent worth and dignity of every human life” and the scourge of “destructive partisanship.” That unifying message stood in stark contrast to more than 2½ years of name-calling, demonizing minorities and inflaming racial animus, much of it carried out on Twitter. Such is the picture of a divisive leader trying to act as a healer, particularly in the aftermath of Saturday’s anti-immigrant attack in El Paso, where officials are still investigating but believe the alleged gunman posted a manifesto that echoed Trump’s harsh rhetoric on immigrants, including describing his attack as “a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas.” Trump, in tweets and in rallies, has repeatedly decried the “invasion” of undocumented immigrants across the nation’s southern border. Go to the link in our bio to rad more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford /The Washington Post)

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1 week ago

Fact check: In responding to the weekend attacks in two major cities, President Trump touted what he described as “bipartisan” efforts to deal with gun violence. The Fact Checker was curious about one of his claims — that the administration in 2018 prosecuted “a record number of firearms offenses” — and wondered about what he left off his list. Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Video by Meg Kelly/The Washington Post)

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1 week ago

Three months ago, President Trump asked the audience at one of his Florida rallies how to stop migrants from crossing into the United States. “How do you stop these people? You can’t, there’s —” Trump said, cutting himself off as a rally attendee yelled back, “Shoot them.” Trump paused and smirked, before responding, “That’s only in the Panhandle can you get away with that statement.” The crowd cheered for nearly 10 seconds before Trump continued. After at least 31 people were killed over 13 hours over the weekend, Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric is again coming under scrutiny following an uptick in domestic terrorism arrests, most involving some form of white supremacy. On Monday, Trump condemned white supremacy, something he has downplayed in the past. It’s reminiscent of a pattern he exhibits when asked to condemn racist and violent acts by audience members at his rallies. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

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