44lowresolutionhouses Photos & Videos

8 months ago

"The distinction between our private and public lives has never been more blurred. Our living rooms turn into civic spaces and work follows us home, while we increasingly conduct our private lives in public. The space of the domestic interior has collapsed with the public square. Domesticity appears a think of the past, and yet it is everywhere." - 44 Low-resolution Houses, Foreword, Mónica Ponce de León Book by @mmmosarchitects and published by @princetonarchitecture. Graphic design @studiolin. . . . #monicaponcedeleon #mpdlstudio #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonarchitecture #architecture #domesticity #design

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8 months ago

From @princetonarchitecture Join us on November 8th and 9th for our Low-resolution Houses Symposium. In conjunction with our 44 Low-resolution Houses exhibition, the symposium expands the Low-resolution label beyond the gallery. Considering houses through the double lens of technology and representation—a desirable design object, an image, a stage set, a thing, a product both in how it is made and culturally understood—the symposium addresses three themes: Low-Res Elements, Low-Res Tectonics, and Low-Res Organization. A roundtable featuring Dean Mónica Ponce de León, Associate Professor Michael Meredith, and Professor Stan Allen will take place on November 8th. The symposium continues on November 9th with selected exhibition participants, including Adamo-Faiden, Atelier Barda, Besler & Sons, Bureau Spectacular, Ensamble Studio, First Office, The LADG, MAIO, Outpost Office, Paul Preissner, T+E+A+M, and Hans Tursack. Link in bio for details. #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu

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8 months ago

Join us today from 10am-5pm for the Low-resolution Houses Symposium. In conjunction with our 44 Low-resolution Houses exhibition, which closes today, the symposium expands the Low-resolution label beyond the gallery. Considering houses through the double lens of technology and representation—a desirable design object, an image, a stage set, a thing, a product both in how it is made and culturally understood—the symposium addresses three themes: Low-Res Elements, Low-Res Tectonics, and Low-Res Organization. 📸: @mvahrenwald #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu

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8 months ago

#regram from @outpostoffice , one of the studios participating in our Low-resolution Houses Symposium kicking off tonight at 6pm: @outpostoffice is excited to head to @princetonarchitecture today to participate in the Low-resolution Houses Symposium, organized by Michael Meredith ( @mmmosarchitects ). The symposium takes place this evening, Thursday, November 8th at 6:00pm and Friday, November 9th from 10:00am to 5:00pm in Betts Auditorium. Many thanks to Princeton, Dean Mónica Ponce de León, Courtney Coffman ( @coco_coffman ) and @mmmosarchitects for including us in an incredible line-up of friends and heroes...we’re looking forward to the conversation. #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu

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8 months ago

Don’t miss the chance to see 44 Low-resolution Houses, our current exhibition curated by Associate Professor Michael Meredith ( @mmmosarchitects ), before it closes next Friday, November 9th. The closing event, our Low-resolution Houses symposium, will take place on Thursday, November 8th at 6:00pm and Friday, November 9th from 10:00am to 5:00pm in Betts Auditorium. #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu 📸: @mvahrenwald

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8 months ago

Join us on November 8th and 9th for our Low-resolution Houses Symposium. In conjunction with our 44 Low-resolution Houses exhibition, the symposium expands the Low-resolution label beyond the gallery. Considering houses through the double lens of technology and representation—a desirable design object, an image, a stage set, a thing, a product both in how it is made and culturally understood—the symposium addresses three themes: Low-Res Elements, Low-Res Tectonics, and Low-Res Organization. A roundtable featuring Dean Mónica Ponce de León, Associate Professor Michael Meredith, and Professor Stan Allen will take place on November 8th. The symposium continues on November 9th with selected exhibition participants, including Adamo-Faiden, Atelier Barda, Besler & Sons, Bureau Spectacular, Ensamble Studio, First Office, The LADG, MAIO, Outpost Office, Paul Preissner, T+E+A+M, and Hans Tursack. Link in bio for details. #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu #adamofaiden

871
8 months ago

Join us on November 8th and 9th for our Low-resolution Houses Symposium. In conjunction with our 44 Low-resolution Houses exhibition, the symposium expands the Low-resolution label beyond the gallery. Considering houses through the double lens of technology and representation—a desirable design object, an image, a stage set, a thing, a product both in how it is made and culturally understood—the symposium addresses three themes: Low-Res Elements, Low-Res Tectonics, and Low-Res Organization. A roundtable featuring Dean Mónica Ponce de León, Associate Professor Michael Meredith, and Professor Stan Allen will take place on November 8th. The symposium continues on November 9th with selected exhibition participants, including Adamo-Faiden, Atelier Barda, Besler & Sons, Bureau Spectacular, Ensamble Studio, First Office, The LADG, MAIO, Outpost Office, Paul Preissner, T+E+A+M, and Hans Tursack. Link in bio for details. #44lowresolutionhouses #princetonschoolofarchitecture #studyarchitecture #superarchitects #architecture #architectureschool #princetonu

1845
8 months ago

#regram from @log_grams : Forty-four white paper models gleam through the windows of the North Gallery at the Princeton School of Architecture like pixels on a screen. Curated by Michael Meredith, “44 Low-Resolution Houses,” courts a technological metaphor: the gallery has been transformed into a “black box,” and the curatorial statement posits “low-resolution” as a concept that is both technologically and aesthetically loaded. But the exhibition is first and foremost a group show, the kind that says more about the state of architecture than spotlights any individual practice. What distinguishes this from recent exhibitions is the ruthless completeness of the aesthetic intervention, erasing any trace of the gallery, which is wrapped in black curtains on three sides, leaving open only the fourth wall of floor-to-ceiling windows behind a phalanx of spotlights and a row of folded steel benches designed by MOS. Just outside the gallery is a pile of building materials that belong to the real structures. You could take it as a critical stance on postdigital vision, where materiality and abstraction coexist but never fully reconcile. Of course, this is the condition of looking at architecture today; mediation comes with the territory. At a computer (or more likely, on a phone) images of architecture scroll along. Even a visit “in person,” that genuine experience of the real, is just a chance to take and add images to the stream. As Meredith writes, “Houses were chosen simply because there are a lot of them circulating around the internet, available to gather.” Houses circulate, like memes, rather than stand firmly on solid ground. Before I arrived in Princeton, “44 Low-Resolution Houses” came to me as an image on my phone. Here, as there, architecture appears as an image seen through glass, surrounded by an abstract space of information. #Log observation by Phillip Denny. See #Log44 for all #44LowResolutionHouses. Photo: Michael Vahrenwald. @phillipdenny @mmmosarchitects

1791
8 months ago

Thanks @log_grams for posting my observation on @mmmosarchitects #44LowResolutionHouses at @princetonarchitecture. ・・・ Forty-four white paper models gleam through the windows of the North Gallery at the Princeton School of Architecture like pixels on a screen. Curated by Michael Meredith, “44 Low-Resolution Houses,” courts a technological metaphor: the gallery has been transformed into a “black box,” and the curatorial statement posits “low-resolution” as a concept that is both technologically and aesthetically loaded. But the exhibition is first and foremost a group show, the kind that says more about the state of architecture than spotlights any individual practice. What distinguishes this from recent exhibitions is the ruthless completeness of the aesthetic intervention, erasing any trace of the gallery, which is wrapped in black curtains on three sides, leaving open only the fourth wall of floor-to-ceiling windows behind a phalanx of spotlights and a row of folded steel benches designed by MOS. Just outside the gallery is a pile of building materials that belong to the real structures. You could take it as a critical stance on postdigital vision, where materiality and abstraction coexist but never fully reconcile. Of course, this is the condition of looking at architecture today; mediation comes with the territory. At a computer (or more likely, on a phone) images of architecture scroll along. Even a visit “in person,” that genuine experience of the real, is just a chance to take and add images to the stream. As Meredith writes, “Houses were chosen simply because there are a lot of them circulating around the internet, available to gather.” Houses circulate, like memes, rather than stand firmly on solid ground. Before I arrived in Princeton, “44 Low-Resolution Houses” came to me as an image on my phone. Here, as there, architecture appears as an image seen through glass, surrounded by an abstract space of information. #Log observation by Phillip Denny. See #Log44 for all #44LowResolutionHouses. Photos: Michael Vahrenwald. @phillipdenny @mmmosarchitects @princetonarchitecture

1690
8 months ago

Forty-four white paper models gleam through the windows of the North Gallery at the Princeton School of Architecture like pixels on a screen. Curated by Michael Meredith, “44 Low-Resolution Houses,” courts a technological metaphor: the gallery has been transformed into a “black box,” and the curatorial statement posits “low-resolution” as a concept that is both technologically and aesthetically loaded. But the exhibition is first and foremost a group show, the kind that says more about the state of architecture than spotlights any individual practice. What distinguishes this from recent exhibitions is the ruthless completeness of the aesthetic intervention, erasing any trace of the gallery, which is wrapped in black curtains on three sides, leaving open only the fourth wall of floor-to-ceiling windows behind a phalanx of spotlights and a row of folded steel benches designed by MOS. Just outside the gallery is a pile of building materials that belong to the real structures. You could take it as a critical stance on postdigital vision, where materiality and abstraction coexist but never fully reconcile. Of course, this is the condition of looking at architecture today; mediation comes with the territory. At a computer (or more likely, on a phone) images of architecture scroll along. Even a visit “in person,” that genuine experience of the real, is just a chance to take and add images to the stream. As Meredith writes, “Houses were chosen simply because there are a lot of them circulating around the internet, available to gather.” Houses circulate, like memes, rather than stand firmly on solid ground. Before I arrived in Princeton, “44 Low-Resolution Houses” came to me as an image on my phone. Here, as there, architecture appears as an image seen through glass, surrounded by an abstract space of information. #Log observation by Phillip Denny. See #Log44 for all #44LowResolutionHouses. Photos: Michael Vahrenwald. @phillipdenny @mmmosarchitects @princetonarchitecture

2121
10 months ago

#44LowresolutionHouses opens tonight @PrincetonArchitecture , 5:30p. The exhibition is curated by Michael Meredith and designed by MOS ( @mmmosarchitects ), with graphic design by Studio Lin ( @studiolin ), and fashion design by Slow and Steady Wins the Race ( @slowandsteadywinstherace ). “The exhibition consists of 44 houses by 44 architecture offices. The house has an exhaustive history within architecture. As a protagonist of formalism throughout modernism and postmodernism, it has been a recurring problem for urbanism. And, simultaneously, it has been considered a solution for urbanism and a problem for formalism (Levittown). The house has been at the center of phenomenological questions (dwelling), a frequent site of the everyday vernacular, and the primary subject of the digital/virtual. In this particular exhibition, houses were chosen simply because there are a lot of them circulating around the Internet, available to gather. And because nowadays the house has seemingly become more and more of a desirable design object, an image, a stage set, a thing, a product both in how it is made and culturally understood. The house is a receptacle for identity and technology, similar to our phones.”

1840
10 months ago

44 Low-resolution Houses - Edition Office exhibiting our cross house at Princeton University in an exhibition curated by @mmmosarchitects . . . 44 Low-resolution Houses September 11-November 9, 2018 Exhibition Opening: September 11, 5:30pm North Gallery, Princeton University School of Architecture @mmmosarchitects @princetonarchitecture #44lowresolutionhouses #geometric #primitive http://soa.princeton.edu/44lowresolutionhouses Exhibition graphic design by @studiolin and fashion design by @slowandsteadywinstherace.

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