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Japanese Art 💮🇯🇵 Photos & Videos on Instagram

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1 week ago

Yoshida Toshi:⁣ ⁣ American Girl A, 1956⁣ American Girl B, 1956⁣

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1 week ago

Kōshirō Onchi: Impression of a Violinist, 1946

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2 weeks ago

Inagaki Tomoo: Cats at Midnight, c. 1950

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2 weeks ago

Takeji Asano: Moonlight in Yasaka Pagoda, 1952

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2 weeks ago

Ito Shinsui: "Sleeping Beauty" (unknown title, offset lithograph from a magazine), c. 1920

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2 weeks ago

Kawase Hasui: Lake Matsubara on a Morning, Shinshu, 1941

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2 weeks ago

Tsuchiya Koitsu: Spring Snow, Kyoto Maruyama, 1936

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2 weeks ago

Kasamatsu Shiro: Shirahone Hot Spring in Shinshu, 1935

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2 weeks ago

Ohara Koson: Dancing Fox with a Lotus-Leaf Hat, c. 1910

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3 weeks ago

Kawase Hasui: Koinobori Carp Banner in Toyohama, Kagawa, 1948 🎏

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3 weeks ago

Yoshida Hiroshi: Rapids, 1928

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3 weeks ago

Kitano Tsunetomi: Heron Maiden, c. 1925⁣ ⁣ Photo: Bandō Tamasaburō performing ‘Heron Maiden’ in 2009 at the Kabukiza Theater in Tokyo⁣ _________________________⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ‘Heron Maiden’ (Sagi Musume) is a traditional dance in Japanese Kabuki theatre in which the spirit of a white heron takes the form of a young girl. The dance features a single dancer in a female role and tells a sorrowful story of unrequited love and emotional self-destruction. ⁣ ⁣ The performance opens with the spirit of the white heron wandering through snow (white is the color of sorrow) before it is revealed, through a costume change, that the heron was a beautiful young girl in a previous life. Through transformations and costume changes, the dance then shows both the joyfulness of falling in love and the madness-inducing betrayal that results in the young girl descending to hell to be reborn as the white heron in her next life. ⁣ ⁣ Tsunetomi’s design offers viewers a “close-up view of the Heron Maiden’s tormented psyche. Hunched over with her head bowed, she draws her left hand, buried in the sleeve of her robe, up to her face. In Japanese visual culture, this gesture signifies emotional distress. The sleeve bears a faint pattern of willow boughs, a tree associated with death and often the only prop sharing the stage with the Heron Maiden in kabuki performances.”⁣ ⁣ Allan Hockley: The Women of Shin Hanga, 2013⁣ _________________________⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Photo credit: ‘Kabuki on the web’ www.kabuki.ne.jp/en

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3 weeks ago

Yoshida Toshi: Heirinji, Temple Bell, 1951

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3 weeks ago

Shimura Tatsumi: Beginning the Dance, 1953⁣ ⁣ “The title of this print suggests that the young woman it features is making her way to what is perhaps the first performance of her dance career. She wears a bright orange haori to protect her elaborate and colorful kimono and obi. The scarf draped over her head protects her coiffure. The look in her eyes and the gesture of holding a corner of the scarf in her mouth convey anxiousness over her pending debut.”⁣ ⁣ Allan Hockley: The Women of Shin Hanga, 2013⁣

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3 weeks ago

Ohara Koson: Magnolia and Black-Winged Magpie, 1930s

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3 weeks ago

Utagawa Hiroshige: Mannen Bridge, Fukagawa, 1858⁣ ⁣ ⁣ The turtle, a common symbol of longevity in Japan and China, is a reference to the name of the bridge, ‘Mannen’, meaning 10.000 years. Hiroshige’s design also hints at a traditional Buddhist custom that was popular among the citizens of Edo at the time. Turtles would be released into the canals of the city to symbolize the ‘releasing of life’. The turtles, which were also a popular type of pet, were sold by street vendors who offered their wares close to the main bridges of Edo. ⁣

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4 weeks ago

Utagawa Hiroshige: Mountain Gorge in Winter, 1842

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4 weeks ago

Katsushika Hokusai: Yōrō Waterfall in Mino Province, 1832

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